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SCHEDULE of EVENTS

Outsiders: Folk Art in the Rural South

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Kingfisher Art Co., 7 East 2nd Ave., Rome

This unique art exhibit, sponsored by the Rome Area Council for the Arts, will feature works by self taught artists living and creating in the southeast. The Opening Celebration is free, and will feature works and a performance by Abe Partridge (Montgomery, AL), along with works by Tex Crawford (Commerce, GA), Robinella (Maryville, TN), Brad Cochran (Canton, GA), James Schroeder (Kingston, GA), James Barron (Anniston, AL), Scott Thomas (Mentone, AL). The gallery will be open noon-8pm, with the Opening Celebration from 3pm-8pm, and will include a free live music performance by Abe Partridge 6pm-8pm. The gallery bar will be serving beer and wine, mocktails, soft drinks and waters. This will be a stop on the Outsider Art Trail, an event put together by the Paradise Garden Foundation. Participants can hit all the art spots on the driving trail and have a chance to win an overnight stay in one of the cottages at Howard Finster's Paradise Garden. Other stops on the Outsider Art Trail include the Rock Garden in Calhoun, Ga and Trade Day in Summerville, Georgia, and are all kid friendly and dog friendly. For a complete list of the stops visit the Paradise Garden website at paradisegardenfoundation.org.

Alabama's Abe Partridge received national and international recognition in early 2018 when he released his first official full-length release, Cotton Fields and Blood For Days, to rave reviews and substantial airplay on Americana radio. It landed Partridge a lengthy feature in The Bitter Southerner and the album was chosen to be one of their “Top 30 albums of 2018.” Ranging from the earthy to the surreal, from the spiritual light to the depths of depression, Partridge draws listeners in with a combination of southern gothic storytelling, dark humor, and gripping intensity. When Partridge is not writing or touring, he is creating his folk art paintings, which now hang in art galleries around the Southeast and in the private collections of Tyler Childers, Mike Wolfe (American Pickers), and Rick Hirsch (Wet Willie). He painted the cover art for Charlie Parr’s, Last Of The Better Days Ahead (Smithsonian Folkways). His monthly subscription-based art club has sustained him (and his wife and 3 children) during the Covid-19 pandemic. American Songwriter Magazine said, “Abe Partridge has established himself as one of the most respected songwriters and visual folk artists in the southeast.” Partridge has recently resumed touring, including a recent “Artist Spotlight” at the legendary Bluebird Café and a showcase for his art and music at the 2021 FinsterFest. Partridge is currently putting the finishing touches on a new studio album projected to be released in early 2023.

Kingston, Georgia's James Schroeder is no stranger to Rome, as he is kin to the founders of Broad Street’s Schroeders Deli, a local favorite for pizza and sandwiches. James Schroeder (b.1983 Rome Ga) is a self taught Folk-Pop stencil artist who creates murals on doors and posters using spray paint, tape, and hand cut stencils to feature the forgotten individuals in History. His art has been seen on MTV, several folk art museums, the National Pastime Museum, and The King Center in Atlanta. He was a finalist for the art installation contest at The Mercedes Benz stadium. James also paints posters to hand out at the local MLK Jr celebration as well as BLM events during the unrest after the killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery. Additionally, he is the founder and organizer of the annual anti-bullying event, Ginger Pride, that ran from 2011-2019. James is currently a teacher, coach, and comedian.

For artist and musician Robinella, her music and art are woven together into the fabric of her life. “The more things change the more they stay the same. The longer I live the more I see the truth in this statement. And the truth I see is that as the day to day passes, while the years roll on, our lives are full of repetition -- repetition in choices, repetition in words, repetition of body and mind. As an artist, and a singer and songwriter, I see this repetition in paint, in color, and in song rolling off my lips. I'm from East Tennessee and this means a lot of things to different people. To me, it means a big family, a mild climate, an accent, a thank you and your welcome”.

The colorful works of Tex have been seen in galleries and arts festivals throughout the southeast, including Roots Up Gallery in Savannah, the Quinlan Visual Arts Center in Gainesville, GA, the OCAF Gallery in Watkinsville, the Steffen Thomas Museum in Madison, the Lyndon House Gallery in Athens, and the Georgia Museum of Art. Tex was born in Warner Robins GA in 1970. As a child of the 70's his visual nourishment came from an assortment of comic books, cartoons and lots of sci fi and monster movies. As well as his father's subscriptions to National Geographic, Time and Life magazines all of which have inspired some of the images and iconography in his art along his creative path. Tex is a self taught outsider artist who has been working with reclaimed materials in his art for over 25 year. Tex specifically likes working with reclaimed roofing tin as his preferred medium for the last 18 years. His techniques as well as vision have evolved a lot since then in many ways. He has created thousands of creations out of many fallen barn buildings and house tin roofs using an assortment of primitive tools guided by his curiosity and compulsion! He uses a lot of radiant and bright colors that embody positive energy as well as incorporating a lot of tooth and claw. For him, it's all about finding the balance between joy and the happiness we experience in life, and the trials and tribulations that sometimes we must endure to both appreciate and understand that joy.

Painter, furniture maker, and sculptor James Barron was born November 1955 in south Mississippi. He moved to Atlanta, Georgia in 1982 and worked in advertising and design until 1998. Following his intuition he found a metal worker who hired him to help in his shop located in a warehouse on the fringe of the city. There he found other artists and cheap rent, and this combination fostered his creative growth. He began painting in 2000. Moving west, he tried to locate in Seattle but ended up in Lopez Island in Puget Sound, and again focused on the creative process. With every move his art matured, and he now lives in Pell City, Alabama in a cabin he built from the ground up out of salvaged materials.

Scott Thomas, from Mentone, Alabama, works predominantly with acrylic paint on 3 dimensional objects including musical instruments and vintage cameras. Scott also paints on canvas and wooden boards. Growing up in a mill village in Northwest Georgia, Scott credits his grandmother’s quilt making as the inspiration for his unique style. He turned to painting as a creative outlet at the age of 58 and has been passionately pursuing this art form for 15 years.

Bradley Cochran, AKA Rolling Nowhere, is a self taught artist and songwriter born in Rome, Georgia. A self-proclaimed late bloomer, Brad started writing and performing music at age 30 and began painting in 2016 at the age of 40. While working dude ranches in Wyoming in his twenties, Brad fell in love with Western Landscapes and culture. His subjects include Cowboys, Western landscapes, skulls, while also paying homage to his love of American roots music. “I painted myself out of a dark period in my life and found my passion inside a world of bright colors. I’m basically putting everything I love into a blender, adding color and moving forward to an unknown destination with my Art. “

The exhibit runs through July 9, and will feature ticketed performances throughout by several of the artists at various dates, with Brad Cochran performing June 25 and Robinella performing July 2. Kingfisher is a downtown Rome location with no designated parking lot. Look for street parking along Broad St. and E 1st St., or use one of the closest parking lots a block away at either the lot behind Harvest Moon, or Truist Bank, and the Roman Chariot provides free rides from and to anywhere in downtown Rome if you text them your location at 706-413-2822.

*LIVE MUSIC* with BRAD COCHRAN

Kingfisher Art Co., 7 East 2nd Ave., Rome

Bradley Cochran, AKA Rolling Nowhere, is a self taught artist and songwriter born in Rome, Georgia. A self-proclaimed late bloomer, Brad started writing and performing music at age 30 and began painting in 2016 at the age of 40. While working dude ranches in Wyoming in his twenties, Brad fell in love with Western Landscapes and culture. His subjects include Cowboys, Western landscapes, skulls, while also paying homage to his love of American roots music. “I painted myself out of a dark period in my life and found my passion inside a world of bright colors. I’m basically putting everything I love into a blender, adding color and moving forward to an unknown destination with my Art. “ Brad's performance is in conjunction with the art exhibit featuring his paintings at Kingfisher, entitled OUTSIDERS: Folk Art from the Rural South, which runs through July 9. Kingfisher is a downtown Rome location with no designated parking lot. Look for street parking along Broad St. and E 1st St., or use one of the closest parking lots a block away at either the lot behind Harvest Moon, or Truist Bank, and the Roman Chariot provides free rides from and to anywhere in downtown Rome if you text them your location at 706-413-2822.

$10 advance/ $15 day of show

Robinella’s career began with a sort of luck that rarely comes to most artists within their lifetime. What started out as a simple husband-and-wife duo fresh out of college quickly grew to a full-fledged band that blended Bluegrass, Country and Jazz. The combination of Robinella's honey-sweet vocals with violin, mandolin, bass, drums and piano captivated audiences, thus creating the ever popular Robinella & the CC Stringband. They released their first album, self-titled Robinella and The CC Stringband, in 2000, which quickly followed, No Saint, No Prize in 2001. Both were on the independent label Big Gulley Records. With a few simple twists of fate, what followed was a whirlwind of rapid success - Columbia Records liked what they heard and signed Robinella in 2002. The label took seven songs from the band’s two prior albums and released them as the CD Blanket for My Soul and then released a full album in 2003, Robinella and the CC Stringband. This led to a national tour including opening for such artists as Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Earl Scruggs, Nickel Creek, Robert Earl Keen, Kasey Chambers, Del McCoury and Rodney Crowell as well as an appearance on “Late Night with Conan O’Brien” and a music video on CMT for their hit single, “Man Over”. She also performed on NPR’s “Mountain Stage,” appeared on the Grand Ole Opry and performed on PBS’s “SoundStage.” In 2006, Robinella was nominated for “Emerging Artist of the Year” at the Americana Music Awards and released her fourth album, “Solace for the Lonely”, on Dualtone Records in Nashville. But then life, as it has a tendency to do, threw a few curveballs her way. She became a mom and a couple of years later, she and her husband/musical partner split up with a new record almost completed. Exhausted and somewhat disillusioned with the industry and its promises, it was time to regroup, redefine and get back to her roots. So she returned to her home, the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains, and got back in touch with what she truly wanted – love, family, friendship, music, art, truth. With that comes her latest release, “Fly Away Bird”, her most mature work. However, within the melancholy and touches of sadness there is not true despair. For such a voice — that dazzling, warm, bright-as-summer-sunshine soprano — to even communicate it would most likely defy certain laws of emotional physics. No, instead, this album, beneath the disappointments, she is brimming with optimism — with hope. You can feel it, and even more important than that, you believe — because she believes, and because her music is so honest and so genuine and so forthright that you just can't help but knowing that this is an artist who still finds life to be magical. Artist's Statement "The more things change the more they stay the same." The longer I live the more I see the truth In this statement. And the truth I see is that as the day to day passes, while the years roll on, our lives are full of repetition -- repetition in choices, repetition in words, repetition of body and mind. As an artist, and a singer and songwriter. I see this repetition in paint, in color, and in song rolling off my lips. I'm from East Tennessee this means a lot of things to different people. To me, it means a big family, a mild climate, an accent, a thank you and your welcome. It means part of an old hymn. "Lord lead me on from day to day I want to walk the holy way though friends forsake me all alone, I ask the Lord to lead me on..." It means modesty. It means character. What can I say about my music but that it is intertwined with my life. The songs I have written, the songs I will write... These words I know because I have either lived them or seen them or felt them over and over, over and over, over and over again. I've seen many things. Some people would say I was naive. Maybe naive is a choice. I believe in beautiful, beautiful, beautiful. Can you see it? Want me to try and show you? I will. With repetition, with a country song, with a smile, with a jazzy phrase I heard in a movie, with some fancy chords a man showed how to play. With some truth. With some lies.

$10 advance/ $15 day of show

*LIVE MUSIC* with Smith & Calvert

Kingfisher Art Co., 7 East 2nd Ave., Rome

Join us for a special evening of music with Leah Calvert and Michael Smith (the Dappled Grays) $10 adv, $15 at the door, table reservations available, all ages welcome. Doors open at 7pm, showtime 8pm. "Two instruments, two voices, beautiful songs and captivating harmonies. As the lead writers and voices of the popular bluegrass band, the Dappled Grays, Leah and Michael share a long musical history. They used the downtime of the pandemic to write an entire new catalog of music and launched their new project, Smith & Calvert. Their 12 episode Video Podcast "About a Song" is out now. Michael has played with Sugarland, John McEuen (of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band), the legendary bluegrass fiddler Bobby Hicks, and for 10 years, shared the stage with Lauren Morrow as a member of the Whiskey Gentry. Leah is a first call Atlanta fiddler/violinist and singer. Apart from releasing her own music, she currently plays and records with John Driscoll Hopkins (of the Zac Brown Band) and has recorded extensively with Kristian Bush (of Sugarland)." The gallery bar will be open, serving beer, wine, soft drinks, and waters. There is plenty of parking at the Truist Bank, just a block away, located at 100 E 2nd Ave, Rome, GA. Or behind the Harvest Moon. Kingfisher is located off Broad Street, on E 2nd Ave, in the yellow West Lofts building in downtown Rome, GA. For more info 404-310-8910

$10-$70

ART & MARGO ROSENBAUM Opening Reception OCT. 1, Exhibit runs to Oct. 29

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Kingfisher Art Co., 7 East 2nd Ave., Rome

Art and Margo Rosenbaum have spent their careers and marriage traveling across different media and modes through various states of space and time. Trained and active in painting, they have also for over 50 years documented the heritage of American roots music and folk culture through recordings, drawings and paintings, essays, and photographs. These varied media have been compiled in books and box sets, including Art of Field Recording Vol I and II: Traditional Music Documented by Art Rosenbaum. Volume 1 of the set won a Grammy Award for Best Historical Album in 2008. These varied practices intersect and complement each other as both artists capture the identity of a nation as expressed through its musical and folk traditions and express their own personal preoccupations in their paintings. The Rosenbaums’ practice is rooted in mid-century modernist figurative painting that, like American folk music, balances personal expression with universal experience. Margo Newmark Rosenbaum (b. 1939) was initially introduced to the Bay Area Figurative movement as a student at the San Francisco Art Institute where she studied with Richard Diebenkorn and Elmer Bischoff. In reaction to the dominance of Abstract Expressionism, these San Francisco Bay artists reintroduced recognizable subject matter into abstract painting through which they evoked a strong sense of place. Art Rosenbaum (b. 1938) also emerged from the post-Abstract Expressionist milieux, finding influences in the abstract, socially minded narratives of Philip Guston and John Heliker. Art majored in Art History and later earned an MFA in Painting at Columbia University in his native New York where he also dabbled in the city’s nascent folk music scene. While in college, he also began to capture field recordings of unknown and unsung blues and folk musicians. With these early roots in painting, performance, and cataloging, the paths of Art and Margo converged in New York, where they met and married in 1966 after Art returned from studying in Paris. In 1968, Art secured a teaching position at the University of Iowa where Margo acquired an interest in photography while earning an MA in Painting. The couple eventually settled in Athens, Georgia in 1976 where Art assumed a teaching position for the next thirty years at the Lamar Dodd School of Art at the University of Georgia, serving as the first Wheatley Professor in Fine Arts before his retirement in 2006.